Indian Sliding Techniques Part II: Example 1f

This lesson tries to exploit the "three-notes-to-a-string concept" even further.

Each string has three notes played on it.

When moving up to the A, D, G and high E strings, you will always be moving up one fret on the new string. When moving up to the B string from the G string, you will always move up two frets.

When moving down to the G, D, A, and low E strings, you will always be moving down one fret on the new string. When moving down form the high E string to the B string, you will always move down two frets.

You can also pay attention to the fact that as this example is played it shows the fingering alternating that takes place. You will see when playing the low E, D, and B strings that you are using fingers 1, 2, and 4. When playing the A, G, and high E string you are using fingers 1, 3, and 4. So the fingering alternates as you move through the string.

This seems like a lot going on in this Example, so I will show you an exercise I use to get my fingers to memorize the scale. Just play it with a metronome over and over. Even after years of playing it I STILL work it with a metronome, and did so before creating this video. Slow and Even is the key to getting your hands and fingers tailored for this scale.

I also explain that by playing only the starting and ending notes from each string you are playing all m3 Intervals, which are at the heart of the "diminished" sound. This covers the Tri-Tone Intervals within these patterns.